Cool eBikesLaws and stuff

Speed eBikes

I’ve been looking at fast eBikes, also known as Speed Pedelecs on the continent.  These are eBikes which are ungoverned in speed and so can exceed the 15.5mph/25 kmh legal limit for an unlicensed uninsured bike.  They include bikes which don’t require pedalling to go – be they “twist and go” or push button throttle.

Whilst it seems that this is just the governments being spoilsports, the risks of a pushbike-alike moped tearing through other bikes at 45 kmh or 30 mph+ is quite high.  Imagine the carnage of a crash in the cycle lane.  I know that some cyclists can well exceed 15 mph on pedal power but if bikes are to gain in popularity and broaden their appeal to more riders then a consideration of speed and other cyclists is a good thing.   If you do fancy some illegal Speed Pedelec action check out youtube where there is a rich seam of homemade speed machines…)

Anyway if you want a Speed Pedelec, here from Cycling Industry News is a great article on how to get one and what you need to do to ride it not the road.  The article refers to Riese & Muller who are a quality German manufacturer and do a great selection of real quality eBikes including cargo to commuter and leisure bikes. All have Bosch motors and are crank drive.

“Speed bikes, the process

1. Order the bike. (Riese & Müller’s HS bikes come with a Certificate of conformity. Dealers will have this shipped with the bike. For bikes manufactured this year they need to meet the new regulation – 168/2013/EU, as HS bikes do).
2. Order the forms at forms.dft.gov.uk/order-dvla-forms/. You need a “New vehicle import pack – Application to register a new imported vehicle for use in the United Kingdom” and “V55/4 -Application for a licence for a new motor vehicle and declaration for registration”. This takes five to ten days.
3. Bike arrives.
4. Complete the V267 & V55/4 (information taken from certificate of conformity). If done as a company you will need to include a bank statement and/or utility bill and copy of corporation document. If completed as an individual you’ll need to include a bank statement and/or utility bill and a copy of driving licence/passport.
5. Send completed forms, ID (as detailed in 4), a cheque for £55 made payable to DVLA & the original certificate of conformity to DVLA, Swansea, SA99 1BE.
6. Await the return of the V5C (approximately 2 weeks).
7. Check vehicle tax at vehicleenquiry.service.gov.uk/ (it is exempt, so free).
8. Order a number plate. Jones used demonplates.com. They require a copy of your driver’s licence & V5C registration document.
9. Purchase insurance. Bikesure quoted Jones £135 for third party only, while Quoterack quoted £200 for fully comprehensive.” (c) Cycling Industry News

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